Start your day with water to set yourself up for success

What’s the best part of waking up?

It should be thirst-quenching H2O in your cup. Sleep is important, a full night’s rest prepares you for the next day. But while you’re dreaming away, your body is slowly dehydrating as hours go by without a drink. Being dehydrated makes one prone to suffer from muscle cramps, nausea, lightheadedness, lethargy, and confusion. That’s not a good way to face the day.

 

So what’s the best way to start off your morning? With a full glass of water (about 16 ounces). Skip the diuretics like coffee and tea; they’ll only prolong the symptoms of dehydration. Many people feel like they need the boost of energy from caffeine to “turn their brain on.”

Yes, it’s true that a strong cup of coffee or tea will wake you up, but it’s only a short burst of energy.

Your brain is 73% water (in fact, the human body is roughly 60% water), and you want to think long term here. The coffee will give you energy but only for a short while. For clear thinking throughout the day, you should hydrate your brain first thing.

 
 

Speaking of fueling your brain, breakfast is hugely important for setting the tone of your day.

A tall glass of water first thing can help you get the most out of your morning meal. The carbs, proteins, and fats we consume in our food are spread throughout the body, carried to where they’re needed by the water in your bloodstream. Being properly hydrated makes it that much easier for your body to absorb the nutrients needed to fuel your body and brain for the day ahead.

 

There are many things our bodies do that are dependent upon proper hydration. Water plays a critical role in everything from food digestion to lubricating our joints, along with removing toxins and excess acid from your body. If you’re trying to get into shape, you’ll want to avoid aching or stiff joints, since they can impede your exercise plans.

 

You also want to remain hydrated to help your kidneys do what they do best; cleaning your body of toxin buildup. Water is also crucial for the metabolism of fat. Fat is good for your brain and your body, contrary to popular belief.

Being fully hydrated prepares your body and mind to do their best throughout the entire day.

 

Starting your morning off on a good note is the best way to meet whatever goals you’ve set for yourself that day. Beat the lethargy and lag of the morning by getting a full night’s rest and drinking a large glass of water first thing upon waking up every morning. Now, you know you should start the day by getting hydrated, but it doesn’t stop there.

 

You should strive to stay hydrated throughout the day, too. Humans lose water from sweating, going to the bathroom, and even things as basic as breathing. That loss increases the more physically active you are, so it is especially important to stay hydrated if you’re exercising or have a physically demanding job. Replenishing your body’s stores of water as the day passes can be done as simply as drinking a glass of water every time you feel hungry. Thirst is often mistaken for hunger, and can lead to eating when you don’t need to, taking in excess calories and remaining under hydrated.

 
 

When the hunger pains strike, first try a glass of water and see if that helps curb the craving to snack.

 

A common misconception is that to stay hydrated, you have to drink glass after glass of water, leaving you feeling like a camel. While drinking is the easiest way to shake thirst, there are other options, too! Cucumbers, romaine lettuce, watermelon (most melons, really), and berries are all rich in nutrients and flush with water. A good snack to both fill and hydrate yourself could be a cup of greek yogurt with some sliced strawberries.

 

Cucumbers have a 95% water content, so add a cup of sliced cucumber to your lunchtime salad. Combined with tomatoes (another water powerhouse at 94%), they’ll leave you feeling full and refreshed.

By staying fully hydrated from when you wake up to when you fall into bed, you help keep your body ready to handle anything, from thought-heavy work projects to going for a healthy run.